Teen Conflict Resolution – Taking Safety

Business

This is for teachers, administrators and counselors who are involved in teen conflict resolution. Those who work with teens involved in conflict require special skills to facilitate a positive resolution that has significant results and lasting success.

When attempting to promote positive change one key ingredient is an acceptance of a measure of personal responsibility. When conducting group conflict resolution it may well be helpful to employ tactics used by professional groups that rely on each other for success.

The Blue Angels precision flying team is one group that has demonstrated success by acceptance of personal responsibility. Following each Blue Angel flight the pilots meet to de-brief the performance. Part of this meeting involves an important section known as “taking a safety”. During this portion of the de-brief each pilot lists specific personal mistakes made during the flight and an explanation of what will be done in following flights to “fix my safeties”. In conclusion the pilot will say, “I am happy to be here.”

“Taking a safety” is very important as each pilot could face disaster if a maneuver is not executed precisely while several jets fly in close proximity with each other.

It can be very embarrassing to admit faults among peers related to judgment or action. This takes great courage and reflects a strong character if one is completely honest. As the pilots “take a safety” trust is built and the team grows in unity as well as performance. The Blue Angels training process provides great insight into improvement of human behavior and the value of taking personal responsibility.

A similar process can be used with great effect among teens who struggle to deal with conflict. The acknowledgment of personal wrongs can go a long way toward repairing teen conflict and resolving group differences.

Encourage positive improvement with the teens you counsel and enable them to fly straighter and higher without bumping into one an another.

Source by Kevin Tingey

(Visited 3 times, 1 visits today)